In order to meet State and District requirements, all students must successfully complete 3 years of Social Studies. These courses must include the topics of Civics, United States History and Geography.

Courses

WORLD HISTORY 
Grade: 9 
5 Credits – Full Year – Required for Graduation 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

World History is a five-credit course required of all students for graduation. The course is designed as the first part in a three-course program whereby students will be exposed to and master the material and skills in the NJCCCS for Social Studies by Grade 12. World History is broken into four pieces, paced to coincide with the four marking periods of the academic year. The four sections are: The Age of Global Encounters (1400 – 1750), The Age of Revolutionary Change (1750 – 1914); The Era of the Great Wars (1914 – 1945); The Modern World (1945 – 2007). This course is designed to move students directly into United States History I with a sound understanding of the political, economic, and social forces that have shaped and will continue to transform the world’s civilizations.


HONORS WORLD HISTORY 
Grade: 9 
5 Credits – Full Year – Meets the World History requirement for graduation 
Prerequisite(s): Grade of an “A” in 8th grade social studies and teacher recommendation. 

This course extends and deepens the topics of the regular course.


UNITED STATES HISTORY I 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year - Required for Graduation 
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of World History. 

United States History I is a five-credit course required of all students for graduation. The course is designed as the middle part in a three-course program whereby students will be exposed to and master the material and skills in the NJCCCS for Social Studies by Grade 12. United States History I is broken into four pieces, paced to coincide with the four marking periods of the academic year. The four sections are: Becoming A Nation; A Nation Divided; A Growing Nation; Emergence of Modern America. This course is designed to move students directly into United States History II and successfully complete their study of this country and its place in the global community.


HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY I 
Grade: 10 
5 Credits – Full Year – Meets the US HISTORY I requirement for graduation. 
Prerequisite(s): Grade of an “A” in World History or minimum grade of a “B” in Honors 
World History. 

This course extends and deepens the topics of the regular course.


UNITED STATES HISTORY II 
Grades: 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year - Required for Graduation 
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of United States History I. 

United States History II is a five-credit course required of all students for graduation. The course is designed as the final part in a three-course program whereby students will be exposed to and master the material and skills in the NJCCCS for Social Studies by Grade 12. United States History II is broken into four pieces, paced to coincide with the four marking periods of the academic year. The four sections are: The Great Depression and the New Deal; World War II and The Cold War; Civil Rights and Domestic Conflicts; Contemporary United States. This course is designed to transition students into the world beyond New Brunswick High School.


HONORS UNITED STATES HISTORY II 
Grade: 11 
5 Credits – Full Year – Meets the US HISTORY II requirement for graduation. 
Prerequisite(s): Grade of an “A” in US History I or minimum grade of a “B” in Honors US 
History I. 

This course extends and deepens the topics of the regular course. It is designed for students 
seeking a challenge in history but not ready to take AP History in Grade 11.


AP UNITED STATES HISTORY 
Grades: 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year – Fulfills US History II Graduation Requirement 
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of World History and US History I and teacher recommendation. 

AP US History is a challenging course designed to be the equivalent of a freshmen college course in a high school setting. It is a survey of American History from the Age of Exploration to the present. It may be taken by any Junior or Senior in addition to, or in place of, U.S. History II. Students will be required to apply the effort necessary to act as an historian and develop the ability to analyze historical evidence to determine its validity and relevance and identify point of view and bias. Students can expect to do a great deal of reading not only in the text, but from outside sources and research both in libraries and through the Internet. Summer readings may be assigned at the teacher’s discretion. AP US History is organized on the assumption that students will sit for the AP examination in May, which will allow qualifying candidates to possibly receive college credit for the course if they score a 4 or 5 on the AP US History Exam.


SOCIAL STUDIES ELECTIVES


AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
2.5 Credits - 1 Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

African American Studies offers students an opportunity to analyze the geography, history and the diverse cultures of Africa. Students will gain an appreciation of the impact which Africans and Africa have had on other regions of the world, particularly the United States. Highlights of the course will include the study of ancient Africa, traditional African cultures, colonialism and nationalism in Africa, migration of Africans and their culture to the United States, and African Americans and contemporary life in the United States.


INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
2.5 Credits – Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

Psychology creates an environment for students to explore the science of behavior. Students delve into the workings of the human brain as well as examine the effects that living in a society has on the development of an individual. Students are challenged to internalize the tenets of this social science and apply their new knowledge of accepted thought and process in continual self-examination. Students are given the opportunity to practice techniques that can improve their dealings with stress, as well as their ability to learn, to memorize, and to handle situations successfully. As an elective in the social sciences, Psychology takes students through five units in order to effectively master the foundations of the field. The units are: The Methods of Madness; The Biopsychological Domain, The Developmental Domain; The 
Cognitive Domain; and Variations in Behavior.


WOMEN’S STUDIES 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
2.5 Credits – 1 Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

This course will examine how modern gender roles have been shaped and changed by the events and trends of the 20th Century. Gender roles in the family and workplace are affected by social, economic and political changes. Students will explore how key events of the 20th century also influenced women in different regions around the world. One of the goals of this course is to break down preconceived notions and to inform and change attitudes about women in American society as well as women around the world.


ART, MUSIC and MEDIA: A Social History of the United States 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
2.5 Credits – 1 Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

This course will provide you with an understanding of major trends in art, literature, movies, music, radio, television, theater, and fads during the last 100+ years. You will gain an understanding of these cultural trends set against the backdrop of World War I, the Roaring 20’s, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, the Era of Camelot and the Great Society, the Vietnam Era, and the Post Cold War era.


DIMENSIONS OF PREJUDICE 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
2.5 Credits – 1 Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

The purpose of this course is to guide students through a variety of learning experiences in order to develop a suitable definition of genocide; to develop a foundation of knowledge about the ultimate incidences of man’s inhumanity to man, to develop an understanding of why such tragedies occur; and to develop strategies for preventing genocides from happening again. In so doing, students will come to understand what is being done about preventing further genocides from occurring and what each individual can do to help.


INTRODUCTION TO LAW* 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

This course is designed to provide students with understanding of the intricacies of the legal system. The course will expose students to the fundamental values and principles of American democracy as expressed in the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. Furthermore, this course will provide students with a deeper understanding of constitutional rights, court systems, criminal law, civil law and civic life, politics and government. Students will be required to conduct legal research and provide written documentation and analysis of specific cases.


POWER, POLITICS and YOU* 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

This course actively connects government to the everyday lives of high schools students. Through hands-on activities, students learn about government at the local, state, and federal levels. Students will learn how they can make a difference in a democracy as well as understand the role of political parties, interest groups, and media on political decisions and political life.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE* 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
2.5 Credits – Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of how society through police, courts and corrections, attempts to deal with the problem of crime. The course examines Criminal Justice through units entitled: the Constitution and the Formation of American Law Enforcement; Social Control within the Democratic Process; Criminal Justice Process; Development of American Policing; Historical Development of Institutional Corrections. Some of the essential questions that will guide students’ in the course are: Do laws restrict us or free us? How does the criminal justice process protect us? Why haven’t we always punished people the same way?


MOCK TRIAL* 
Grades: 11, 12 
2.5 Credits – 1 Semester 
Prerequisite(s): None. 

This elective course is designed to educate the students about the basis of our American judicial system and the mechanics of litigation. They develop an understanding of how both criminal and civil trials work, and learn about the various roles played by participants in the trial court process. Students act as plaintiff and defense attorneys, prosecutors, witnesses and judges. Students also work on important skills such as public speaking, critical thinking, negotiation, communication, debating and team building.


JUNIOR ROTC LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION AND TRAINING I (LET 1)* 
Grades: 9, 10, 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): Must meet Cadet Command criteria for enrollment, as outlined in Army 
Regulation 145-2. 

The Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) offers students a unique opportunity for personal growth and development. In addition to learning about citizenship, students learn to think on their feet, to motivate themselves and others, to make decisions, to work as team members and to lead. The objective of the program is to develop good citizenship in each student, self-discipline, leadership, self-reliance, responsiveness to constituted authority, an ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing and a sense of pride and self accomplishment.


JUNIOR ROTC LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION AND TRAINING (LET 2)* 
Grades: 10, 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): Must meet Cadet Command criteria for enrollment, as outlined in Army 
Regulation 145-2 and have successfully completed LET I. 

The Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) offers students a unique opportunity for personal growth and development. LET 2 is an expansion on the FUNDAMENTALS taught students in LET 1 about citizenship, American military history, and techniques of communication, leadership and basic life skills. Students must learn to think on their feet, to motivate themselves and others, to make decisions, to work as team members and to lead. The overall objective of the program is to develop good citizenship in each student, self-discipline, leadership, self-reliance, responsiveness to constituted authority, an ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing and a sense of pride and self-accomplishment. Expanded leadership roles and opportunities are presented.


JUNIOR ROTC LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION AND TRAINING (LET 3)* 
Grades: 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): Must meet Cadet Command criteria for enrollment, as outlined in Army 
Regulation 145-2 and have successfully completed LET 1 and 2. 

The Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) offers students a unique opportunity for personal growth and development. LET 3 is a further expansion of the 
FUNDAMENTALS taught students in LET 1 and 2 about citizenship, American military history, and techniques of communication, leadership and basic life skills. Students must learn to think on their feet, to act as role models and leaders, to motivate themselves and others, to make decisions and accept the responsibility for these decisions, to work with others as team members and to lead. 

The overall objective of the program remains the same that is, to develop in each student good citizenship, self-discipline, leadership, self-reliance, responsiveness to constituted authority, an ability to communicate effectively both orally and in writing and a sense of pride and self accomplishment. Greater student participation in school, as well as community activities, is expected.


JUNIOR ROTC LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION AND TRAINING (LET 4)* 
Grades: 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): Must meet Cadet Command criteria for enrollment, as outlined in Army 
Regulation 145-2 and have successfully completed LET I, LET2, and LET 3. 

The Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) offers students a unique opportunity for personal growth and development. LET 4 is the culmination of that training and will stress the practical application of the student’s leadership duties and responsibilities within the JROTC cadet organization. The student will be expected to perform independent study and research, present oral and written presentations and complete special assignments on topics such as citizenship, American military history, leadership and basic life skills. Student participation in school, as well as community activities, is required.


JUNIOR ROTC LEADERSHIP, EDUCATION AND TRAINING (LET 5)* 
Grades: 11, 12 
5 Credits – Full Year 
Prerequisite(s): Must meet Cadet Command criteria for enrollment, as outlined in Army 
Regulation 145-2 and have successfully completed LET I, LET2, LET 3, and LET 4. 

The Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) offers students a unique opportunity for personal growth and development. LET 4 is the culmination of that training and will stress the practical application of the student’s leadership duties and responsibilities within the JROTC cadet organization. The student will be expected to perform independent study and research, present oral and written presentations and complete special assignments on topics such as citizenship, American military history, leadership and basic life skills. Student participation in school, as well as community activities, is required. 

* - Law, Public Safety and Security Theme Institute


Faculty

Magee, Amanda
 
Monaghan, Christopher
 
Pallet, Raul
 
Prasovic, Elvir
 
Purtlebaugh, Darren
 
Weiss, David